Hamonshū

This book was published in 1903 as a resource guide for water designs that could be used by craftsmen. The artist, Mori Yuzan, worked in the Nihonga style, which emphasized the beauty of traditional Japanese aesthetics during a period of infatuation with the west. I am infatuated with Hamonshū! I've shot thousands of photographs of waves … Continue reading Hamonshū

Cerulean Blues

June and July and nearly August... As I listed these months, counting the time since my last post, a cover of "Fly Like an Eagle" by Tony Crown started playing in the background. It was a slow ghostly version of the old Steve Miller Band song, never heard this version before. Perfect synchronicity. Time keeps … Continue reading Cerulean Blues

Pool

Pool is finally up at Hosfelt Gallery. Well... it's been up for two weeks, but I'm just getting around to posting some photos. So here's how it works: Pool was shot in the tide pools of Salt Point from late January through April of this year. The video is projected onto the floor, passing through … Continue reading Pool

hermit

the news makes me want to curl up in a shell. and this little ad seems so wrong. cheaper than a candy bar. cheaper than a cup of coffee. cheaper than a pair of sox, three first class stamps, or a pack of gum.

collision

This small stretch of coastal Pacific is part of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, and according to the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Association), this part of the Pacific experiences three seasons, rather than the four seasons of nearby terrestrial life. They are, with short descriptions: Winter Storm: December–February. Storms from the north and west … Continue reading collision

kintsugi

I've been working on this piece since late summer, in short bursts in between other things. The pieces were small, at first. They kept curling in on themselves, the curve of the shell quickly resolving into abalone-sized abalone. And the Japanese enamels traditionally used in kintsugi kept giving me crazy rashes identical to poison oak. I kept … Continue reading kintsugi